Funding

One of the most important ways AIME supports its Member Societies is through access to project and program funding opportunitites and the distribution of legacy fund income. For more information, contact lawriemunro@aimehq.org.

 

Grants

 

United Engineering Foundation (UEF)

AIME is one of 5 member organizations making up the Board of the United Engineering Foundation, whose purpose is to support engineering and education by, among other means, making grants.  For more information on the submission process, click here.

 

James Douglas Library Fund

This endowment was given to AIME by James Douglas in 1916 to support the Institute's library.  Since the mid-1980s when AIME's divisions became separate not-for-profit organizations, AIME transferred the publication of material to its Member Societies.  Therefore, proposals from AIME and its Member Societies are now reviewed to determine the best use of the income from this fund (approximately $40,000 annually).

 

Seeley W. Mudd Fund

Established in 1929, this is the largest fund AIME manages.  Its original purpose was to support the advancement of the sciences of mining and metallurgy by the encouragement of research and the dissemination of knowledge.  For many years, it helped produce some of the finest technical publications in the mineral and petroleum engineering professions.  AIME's Member Society, SME, administers the fund, which accepts proposals for the use of the annual income (approximately $60,000).

 

Member Society Direct

AIME is a 501(c)3 not-for profit entity.  As such, when available, distributions are made to support the projects and programs of its Member Societies.  In 2011, the AIME Board voted to set aside a portion of any annual surplus in a special matching fund to encourage submission of grants for collaborative efforts.

 

Collaborative Grants

In 2011, the AIME Board established a new matching grants program to help encourage submissions of grant requests to the United Engineering Foundation and other entities by the Member Societies.  Whenever AIME has a surplus at year-end, 20% of it (up to $200,000 maximum) can be allocated by the Board to be spent on approved proposals from the Member Societies.  2013 was the first year these funds were available and the AIME Board approved, not only 1 matching grant for the AIST-led Emerging Leaders Alliance but also for a new TMS-led diversity conference honoring AIME's first female member (1879), Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards.  The latter was a collaborative effort with SME involvement.  Hence the new broader titling of "collaborative grants".

 

Other Distributions

 

Charles Hayden Memorial Fund

In 1939, Charles Hayden made a donation to AIME to estalish this fund to further the technical eduation of the student associate members through the preparation and circulation of technical publications.  The annual income from this fund (approximately $25,000) is distrinbuted equally amongst the 4 Member Societies to use for this purpose.

 

Henry L. Doherty Fund

Established in 1953 by a few important figures in the petroleum industry in honor of the fund's namesake, the annual income from this fund (approximately $20,000) is given to AIME's Member Society, SPE, for the printing and distribution of publications and granting of scholarships for research.

 

AIME Petroleum Research and Education Fund

This fund was created in 1966 from a donation by Joseph B. Umpleby to further the educational activities of the SPE, including the financing of special research volumes.  The annual income (approximately $4500) has mainly been used to support student paper contests.

 

Offshore Technology Conference

AIME established the Offshore Technology Conference in 1969.  It has been managed successfully by AIME's Member Society, SPE, and grown to become one of the top 200 trade shows in the United States and top 10 meetings in terms of attendance.  As the founder, AIME has shared in the success of the event annually.  In turn, its Member Societies realize a portion of its share of the proceeds.